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Margaret Sanger's journey into birth control was seeded by her sympathy for mothers who were bearing too many children too quickly, ahead of their economic resources and their ability to parent adequately.  Tenements in the cities were very crowded at the time, and fathers who could not find work frequently took to drinking and carousing, impregnating their wives year after year without thought to the consequences.  (It was said as the railroad was being laid across the country that back in the cities, families had one child for every year of marriage.)

Fighting the heavy hand of the Catholic church as she reasoned for birth control and family planning, Sanger, a nurse by training, had few allies apart from desperate mothers themselves.  The eugenics movement discovered Sanger and gave her support, although her own views did not agree with many of theirs.  Today, the Planned Parenthood organization is quite different from the one Margaret Sanger began.

 

 

Lana Lokteff of Red Ice Media explains another misconception about Margaret Sanger: